Thursday, December 29, 2011

Dr Joseph Warren's Home

   The Bostonian Society has in its collections a nineteenth century engraving purporting to be a depiction of the house Dr Joseph Warren rented on Hanover Street in Boston's North End. In this home Warren lived with his wife (before her death in May 1773) and four children and from it conducted his medical practice. There are conflicting accounts of when he rented this house from Joshua Green, but it most likely was in June 1770, for on that date Warren signed a note setting forth the terms of purchase of a "Negro boy", apparently a servant that came with the home.
  The engraving was donated to the Bostonian Society by the owner of a large hotel which subsequently stood on the site of the Warren home and its accuracy cannot be verified since it appears it was drawn from the memory of people who saw it when it was standing. The home was not far from the Green Dragon Tavern and Paul Revere's House.

The Green/Warren Home
Map of Boston's North End. "Hannover" Street is just south of the Mill Pond (No 6)
                                                            

2 comments:

  1. The shops were located along Hannover Street. The location on the map is near the intersection seen above the "St" of Hannover Street in the 'pie' shaped area marked No.6. This was where the American Hotel was located. The front yard with the picket fence is an unlikely detail. The whole area is now located under the brick paving of Boston City Hall plaza without a marker to commemorate this historic site.

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  2. There should be some sort of marker on the site of Joseph Warren's home on Hanover St. So much history was made on that site, and with all of the changes made to the landscape of that area in recent years, all the more reason to have some interpretation available. Warren was not a minor player in early Boston Revolutionary activities. There is every reason top think he could have risen to office of Governor or even perhaps leadedship on a national stage had he survived. Boston needs to do more to elevate his position in the public discourse.

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